Author Topic: Where do I begin?  (Read 8062 times)

In my workflow, these grunge effects are one of the standart Mesh Adaptive Filtes that ships with SD.
It is called metal edge wear, and gets calculatet from an AO and Curvature map of your model.

I see while I was in SD playing around with things I found it and I found I believe like a wood grunge effect.  You got that node and then you had it connect to the map correct?

Thank you again this really helps me understand SD and it's power.  I have one question about your workflow I seen that you made a metal or metallic weathering or grunge I can't remember the exact name of the map, but how did you make that?  I've never seen anyone use a map of that sort?

Hi Andre,

Is it my workflow you are wondering about? Did you see that map in a video? Just point me to the section in the video and I'll let you know what I did.

Cheers,

Wes

Wes, 

I have watched about five videos of the Substance Designer tutorial there has been a little confusion with them because some parts of the videos were not clear, but I managed.  I do have a couple questions about workflow I made a low res model to bring into Substance Designer ( I used Maya) I had put edge loops so parts of the corners would not be so sharp and had some areas more rounder, but when I brought it in Substance Designer it still had its hard sharp edges.  What is the reason for that.

Secondly when I made the UV's for the model I put them all together in the 0 to 1 space it's a wooden shield with a metal plate in the middle.  For workflow would it have been better if I UV'd  it separately have all the wooden parts of the model UV'd export it out then move on to the metal parts UV them and then Export it out? 

Thank you again this really helps me understand SD and it's power.  I have one question about your workflow I seen that you made a metal or metallic weathering or grunge I can't remember the exact name of the map, but how did you make that?  I've never seen anyone use a map of that sort?

Hi Andre,

Is it my workflow you are wondering about? Did you see that map in a video? Just point me to the section in the video and I'll let you know what I did.

Cheers,

Wes

Wes, 

I have watched about five videos of the Substance Designer tutorial there has been a little confusion with them because some parts of the videos were not clear, but I managed.  I do have a couple questions about workflow I made a low res model to bring into Substance Designer ( I used Maya) I had put edge loops so parts of the corners would not be so sharp and had some areas more rounder, but when I brought it in Substance Designer it still had its hard sharp edges.  What is the reason for that.

Secondly when I made the UV's for the model I put them all together in the 0 to 1 space it's a wooden shield with a metal plate in the middle.  For workflow would it have been better if I UV'd  it separately have all the wooden parts of the model UV'd export it out then move on to the metal parts UV them and then Export it out?

Hi,

I made a low res model to bring into Substance Designer ( I used Maya) I had put edge loops so parts of the corners would not be so sharp and had some areas more rounder, but when I brought it in Substance Designer it still had its hard sharp edges.  What is the reason for that.

Did you soften the edges in Maya? When you export, the FBX option for Smoothing Groups could have been disabled. Substance Designer will import any smoothing groups your set in Maya. I can take a look at the mesh as well.


Secondly when I made the UV's for the model I put them all together in the 0 to 1 space it's a wooden shield with a metal plate in the middle.  For workflow would it have been better if I UV'd  it separately have all the wooden parts of the model UV'd export it out then move on to the metal parts UV them and then Export it out?

No, you wouldn't need to separate them. You could do that. If you have the shield with wooden and metal parts, it would be best to use an ID mask to separate the areas when texturing. Here's how it works.

1. Leave the UVs for the shield in the same UV Set
2. Export the model as normal
3. Back in Maya, set a new material for each part of the mesh you want to be its own material. You will use this to create an ID version of your mesh. For the shield, it would have a material for the wood areas, then a material for the metal. You then export this FBX and will use it to bake the ID map.
4. In Designer, bake from the FBX with the ID materials using Convert UV to SVG with the Color Mode set to Material ID Color. In Maya, you could set the material color, which will become the ID color in the map, or you can set it in Substance Designer. In the attached image, you can see that for the Body, I have a body and and metal material that is isolated by two material IDs.

Now you will have a color ID mask you can use to target sections of the UVs. If you are using the multi-material blend node, you use this ID map blend materials to the area indicated by the map. You can also use the Color to Mask node to generate a mask based on the color ID.

Cheers,

Wes


Head of Substance Demo Art Team
the3dninja@adobe.com
Twitter: The3DNinja

Thank you again this really helps me understand SD and it's power.  I have one question about your workflow I seen that you made a metal or metallic weathering or grunge I can't remember the exact name of the map, but how did you make that?  I've never seen anyone use a map of that sort?

Hi Andre,

Is it my workflow you are wondering about? Did you see that map in a video? Just point me to the section in the video and I'll let you know what I did.

Cheers,

Wes

Wes, 

I have watched about five videos of the Substance Designer tutorial there has been a little confusion with them because some parts of the videos were not clear, but I managed.  I do have a couple questions about workflow I made a low res model to bring into Substance Designer ( I used Maya) I had put edge loops so parts of the corners would not be so sharp and had some areas more rounder, but when I brought it in Substance Designer it still had its hard sharp edges.  What is the reason for that.

Secondly when I made the UV's for the model I put them all together in the 0 to 1 space it's a wooden shield with a metal plate in the middle.  For workflow would it have been better if I UV'd  it separately have all the wooden parts of the model UV'd export it out then move on to the metal parts UV them and then Export it out?

Hi,

I made a low res model to bring into Substance Designer ( I used Maya) I had put edge loops so parts of the corners would not be so sharp and had some areas more rounder, but when I brought it in Substance Designer it still had its hard sharp edges.  What is the reason for that.

Did you soften the edges in Maya? When you export, the FBX option for Smoothing Groups could have been disabled. Substance Designer will import any smoothing groups your set in Maya. I can take a look at the mesh as well.


Secondly when I made the UV's for the model I put them all together in the 0 to 1 space it's a wooden shield with a metal plate in the middle.  For workflow would it have been better if I UV'd  it separately have all the wooden parts of the model UV'd export it out then move on to the metal parts UV them and then Export it out?

No, you wouldn't need to separate them. You could do that. If you have the shield with wooden and metal parts, it would be best to use an ID mask to separate the areas when texturing. Here's how it works.

1. Leave the UVs for the shield in the same UV Set
2. Export the model as normal
3. Back in Maya, set a new material for each part of the mesh you want to be its own material. You will use this to create an ID version of your mesh. For the shield, it would have a material for the wood areas, then a material for the metal. You then export this FBX and will use it to bake the ID map.
4. In Designer, bake from the FBX with the ID materials using Convert UV to SVG with the Color Mode set to Material ID Color. In Maya, you could set the material color, which will become the ID color in the map, or you can set it in Substance Designer. In the attached image, you can see that for the Body, I have a body and and metal material that is isolated by two material IDs.

Now you will have a color ID mask you can use to target sections of the UVs. If you are using the multi-material blend node, you use this ID map blend materials to the area indicated by the map. You can also use the Color to Mask node to generate a mask based on the color ID.

Cheers,

Wes


Wes,

Yes I did soften all the edges and I looked into the FBX options to turn on the smoothing groups, but once I linked the mesh in Substance Designer it showed up without any of the smooth edges that I placed on it.  If you can take a look at my mesh where could I send it to you?

I kept moving forward to make the ID map and thank you for the advice it helped me so much because at first I was bringing in my mesh as OBJ to play around in Substance Designer and I made the all my maps.  Then I used FBX a file and something weird happened when I created my ID map I set the color material for each part of my mesh and on a certain area it created a solid color rectangle that covers parts of the my ID map.  I'll post a picture so you take a look with my UV's.