Author Topic: Substance Designer and Hard light  (Read 3247 times)

Good day!
I wanted to ask - why there are no hard light in substance designer? This is one of the most useful  types in photoshop - it work better with black and white then overlay or soft light. Are you planning it? It's strange that you have it in SP, but it's not in SD
Sergei Leoluch Panin

Still no answer?(
Sergei Leoluch Panin

I believe it isn't there because not many people asked about such a node.

Fortunately, with Pixel Processor node we can have any blending mode we want rather simply :). I've made a node that mimicks the Hard Light you're looking for. Hope you'll find it useful. Download link below.

Last Edit: July 03, 2017, 09:10:50 am

I believe it isn't there because not many people asked about such a node.

Fortunately, with Pixel Processor node we can have any blending mode we want rather simply :). I've made a node that mimicks the Hard Light you're looking for. Hope you'll find it useful. Download link below.

This is great answer, thank you!
Pixel Processor is not very easy for me right now. I have watched allegorithmic tutorial and it was pretty informative , but not enough for regular practice. If you can recommend something, i will really appreciate that.
Sergei Leoluch Panin

I believe it isn't there because not many people asked about such a node.

Fortunately, with Pixel Processor node we can have any blending mode we want rather simply :). I've made a node that mimicks the Hard Light you're looking for. Hope you'll find it useful. Download link below.

Thanks again Sergey! Just wanted to point out that the greyscale version had the bottom input set to 0 instead of 1.

Nice catch! Thank you. Fixed and re-uploaded  :).

If you can recommend something, i will really appreciate that.

Vincent Gault's YouTube channel has some informative videos on Pixel Processor: https://www.youtube.com/user/vinnysud. Apart from that, there's not so much content around, unfortunately.

In general, I would say that most important things for getting familiar with Pixel Processor are the following:

1) Pixel Processor executes its functions on a per-pixel basis and in parallel. It means that for every pixel in the map, the same function will be executed. You can't get the result of such processing to influence something that happens inside the same Pixel Processor node. You can, however, process your maps in several steps by chaining some Pixel Processor nodes in a succession. Intermediate nodes can act as data storage/provider for next nodes in the chain.

2) It's all about manipulating pixels' luminance values. For each individual pixel in a map, you can sample (pick luminance value) basically any pixel on the same map or in an another map plugged to the same Pixel Processor. Alternatively, you can right away write some new values to the pixels without sampling anything based on some logic implemented through the functions.

3) To manipulate values, you'll need to assemble some functions inside Pixel Processor. One needs a very basic understanding of programming and math to grasp it. You'll need to have some idea of what is Float, Integer and Boolean, how If-Else conditions work, what are some other function nodes available inside Pixel Processor. Then it's math - take some value, multiply it with another, add something to it, subtract, etc. The math here CAN be pretty advanced, but it does not necessarily have to be like that. You can use what you know and still get nice results.

4) Actually making some simple Pixel Processor functions helps a lot when you want to quickly get familiar with it. Then you can try new and more complex ideas, make some simple filters using the Pixel Processor, etc. This will get things rolling and in no time, you'll find yourself assembling sophisticated functions to make it do what you want. ;D