Author Topic: baking textures, seem problem and more  (Read 7983 times)

hello

I have a very simple model of rock.
loRes and Hires for baking.

I have a couple of question:

- no matter what setting I'm using for baking, I get a very annoying seem in Normal and other additional maps like curvature!! which is Odd!!
how can I get rid of it??

- I'm using two simple materials. for top material I use a smart mask " cavity Rust". unfortunately I'm getting the seem and I don't know how to fix it.
I'm set all projection in every sections to Tri planar.

please help me out.

please help me if possible.
I really need to know why curvature and normal map show the seam. technically this should not happen right?
in fact It ruins all of the tri planar projection accuracy at once!

I don't know If I'm doing something wrong or I should change the setting or what to do ...

thank you in advance

As for your normal map question — I think that generally you shouldn't be worried about seeing seams in your actual normal map, because seams will always be where tangent space is changing, i.e. along a UV shell border or where smoothing groups meet (hard edges in Maya). If your mesh looks good in shaded view, meaning without a visible lighting seam in that particular area, then your normal map is... normal.  ::)

Curvature map is generated from normal map if you're using per-pixel mode, so it is not a surprise that Curvature map also has this seam.

I can suggest that you double-check your UV's and smoothing groups/hard edges. If there is a UV shell border along the seam that causes you troubles, then you have to organize UV's differently to get rid of it.

thank you

I did a few tests... I raised anti aliased  up to 8.
turned off curvature seam off.
but no luck... the seam always is visible in viewport . and that is not normal at all.

I baked the normal using native Maya transfer map. the result is perfect .
why SP can't bake the normal and curvature maps without seam? !!!!

Ps:  I forgot to say, I exported the normal map out of SP and used in Maya. not even close and seams were even shaper and visiable.. nothing usable.
Last Edit: April 15, 2016, 09:49:53 am

Can you share the meshes ?
Don't forget your log file. It can be exported from the Help menu of the software.
-----------
Fabrice Piquet aka Froyok. Product Manager, Technical Artist and Documentation at Adobe.

yes.
here is the meshes.

So I gave a try at your meshes. There is indeed a seam if you are looking for it, but honestly it's almost invisible. Try to bake at an higher resolution and use tri-planar projections in your mask generators/fill layer, that should hide most of the remaining problem.
Don't forget your log file. It can be exported from the Help menu of the software.
-----------
Fabrice Piquet aka Froyok. Product Manager, Technical Artist and Documentation at Adobe.

thank you

but honestly the seam is quite obvious even using 4k and Tri planar (like the image).

any way is there a way to get rid of it or I should live with the fact that always there will be seam?
( I mean in baking part, not using new clone tool)
Last Edit: April 19, 2016, 02:07:35 pm

I think that it is impossible to get rid of seams in such places completely via baking only. However, there's still something to think about.

To me it looks like you have two kind of seams on your images shown just above. The bottom seam is a texture sampling seam that happens in Painter just because your geometry has a UV seam there. You can't do much with this one, as this has little to do with baking and projecting. You can't paint it out either. The best thing that you probably CAN do is to try and organize your UVs slightly differently, by moving such seams to sharp edges or concave areas, where they naturally will be less visible. Try not to leave them in flat areas. Another thing to keep in mind here that this seams become even less visible when you zoom out a bit, so basically they shouldn't ruin your model in any practical way.

The seam at top, however, is a different story. This is where your material on top has a sharp cut-like clipping, which is very noticeable. This one most likely comes from a mask generator that can't use triplanar projection due to its mechanics. I'm afraid that to get rid of this ones you have to use the Clone Tool, or find some other creative ways to generate your masks. In case of using the Clone Tool, you can Alt-click on your resulting mask to view it on top of your model, then add a Paint effect just above the mask generator(s) you're using, set its blending mode to Passthrough and use Clone Tool to paint over the seams. Given the non-destructive nature of Clone Tool, this probably should be done only once.

By the way, hiding your UV seams will also help with "mask" seams a lot.  :D


The bottom seam is a texture sampling seam that happens in Painter just because your geometry has a UV seam there. .......

The seam at top, however, is a different story........

thank you treidge !
but both images are the same model at different angle!!   :D

shifting Uv's seams to better edges is good idea...I'll do it.
meanwhile, I'm thinking about baking all textures like Normal, thinckness( if there is such thing) and other maps in other app's that can do this task better (if any) and bring them back to SP to use them... is this practical?

Last Edit: April 20, 2016, 07:16:00 am

but both images are the same model at different angle!!   :D

Yes, I was talking about the same model, but maybe communicated it poorly. You have two arrows on your picture, with both pointing alonge the same UV split. But, near the top arrow you have a seam that comes both from mask and texture sampling. You can fix the mask seam (Clone Tool or different approach to generate the mask), so there would be no knife-like clipping of your "moss" material layered on top of the rock, and it will look much better. However, the seam from texture sampling will reman, as it can't be fixed via textures - you can't paint them out.

In other words, both types of texture seams are happening along the same UV split area (UV seam), but have a different nature.

On a picture below I marked the location where seams would be much less noticeable. Note that this is just a general idea of areas where you can place them - as I wrote in my previous post, it's concavities and sharp geometry edges.

You definetly can try to bake in other apps, but I'm pretty confident it wouldn't help much - Substance bakers are really good, and seams in discussion doesn't come from texture images, so this isn't the baker issue.

Oh, and I've checked your lowpoly rock version just this morning and noticed that it has double geometry, i.e. there are two rocks exactly on top of each other. You may want to delete the extra one  ;)

Hope that helps.  :D

Last Edit: April 20, 2016, 08:58:34 am

yes ... helpful definitely!

I did a little more research to see what can be done more.
Imported the SP normal into Maya and compared it with native baked normal map. both renders fines..  at a very close range SP normal show seam but doesn't matter much.  ( need to invert G channel of SP normal map ... interesting!) .

most of the problem comes with curvature map that most of mask generators depend on it.
I imported the maya generated normal map and replaced it with SP normal map... ( as the images) ... well maya's normal is finer and better.

but no matter how fine the Normal map is, the curvature map shows a nasty seam. (generated from noraml?) 

hope the curvature map would have its own procedure and algorithm not relying on normal map but searching for real curvature of the geo.

 



Quote
hope the curvature map would have its own procedure and algorithm not relying on normal map but searching for real curvature of the geo.

We are currently working on it.

We are currently working on it.

very good news indeed!

and please make a option to invert individual channels of normal map for specific packages like maya.
there is no option.
to invert Green channel of the generated normal map I have to do it in photoshop to use it in Maya!.

You don't have to use Photoshop to flip the G channel. You can set the desired normal map format in your Project configuration window (while creating it or changing this setting later on). Baking the additional maps will result in baked normals to be compatible with Maya without further modification required. Maya is using OpenGL format, by the way, and flipping the G basically means switching from DirectX to OpenGL format or vice versa. One thing to remember here is that Maya viewport renderers isn't synced with MikkT tangent space, so you can get some discrepancy in shading while viewing normal maps baked in apps like Substance or xNormal.

Also note that Export Textures configuration window allows you to get resulting normals maps for your project (that contain combined information from baked normal and data that has been painted in normal channel) converted to OpenGL or DirectX format, or even both at the same time.
Last Edit: April 21, 2016, 05:09:42 pm