Author Topic: Atlas Maker and Bleeding edges  (Read 2641 times)

I've recently gotten back into SD and love the idea behind the Atlas Maker.  I'm trying to create a texture set that I can use for a modular level I'm putting together.  The one issue I'm having with it are the UVs when I line them up to the texture.  If I get right on the edge, the other texture bleeds over.  If I go to far in, there are seams.  I'm using the Grid in 3ds Max's Unwrap UVs to match up the texture to the mesh and thought that would help.  Has anyone tried this?  This is my first attempt at it and feel I may be missing something. 



I apologize if the grid hinders the image a little but this is how I had it set up to cut out the bleeding, trying to see if this would do the trick. But caused the seams to appear when I made copies of the mesh.  I will attempt to move the edges out a bit further, maybe that'll do the trick.  I would think an SD node or trick may fix this rather easily, and I just don't have the answer.

Hey,
Making an atlas with a texture which is supposed to tile is always tricky (for the issues you just mentioned and for shader issues as well): I generally make atlases with textures that are not supposed to tile.

That said, if you really want to do so, you can make a small padding for each texture so the external pixeals are spread a bit: it should avoid seams in most of the cases.

In the image below I did one padding with the distance node (the padding is too big, so we can see it)

Hey,
Making an atlas with a texture which is supposed to tile is always tricky (for the issues you just mentioned and for shader issues as well): I generally make atlases with textures that are not supposed to tile.

That said, if you really want to do so, you can make a small padding for each texture so the external pixeals are spread a bit: it should avoid seams in most of the cases.

In the image below I did one padding with the distance node (the padding is too big, so we can see it)

I look forward to trying this out when I get home.  Thank you for the quick reply and I'll post my results when successful. Or Angry.  Ha ha!

Here's where I currently stand.  I have a Shape(Square .98) connected to the Mask Input with the Brick Material Base Color attached to the Source Input of the Distance Node.  On it's own, it works.  Once I connect it to the Atlas, the line you see below, appears.  My last change before posting here was to make all nodes 2048x2048, just to see if it'll work itself out.  Not so much. 

I have tried connecting the Base color of the Atlas Maker to the Distance node, thinking that may get me started and I can tinker with it.  Below is an image of the connecting Atlas Maker and the Distance Node cutting off my texture down the middle due to the Distance Node. 

I'd like to have a Master Material for a modular mansion I have in mind, but feel creating three or four separate tiling base materials may be the better way to go if this can't get figured out.  I just like the idea of having Parameters made up neatly into one list, to change on the fly from said Master Material.



It won't work this way, as your tiling texture and the mask have to be exactly the same size.

That said, as I told you, I wouldn't recommend doing atlases for tiling textures
Last Edit: January 12, 2016, 10:43:24 am

I did a tiling atlas once and it took a lot of tweaking and planning.

Ultimately the polygon savings didn't add up to as much as I had hoped and the environment looked, well less then it could have if I just used a few extra polygons to smooth shapes out and tile the textures that way.

I was targeting a much older IOS at the time, but now days its likely the average phone can push more polygons then a last gen gaming conceal so you don't need to make things overly complicated on your self to save a few polys.

^^

It won't work this way, as your tiling texture and the mask have to be exactly the same size.

That said, as I told you, I wouldn't recommend doing atlases for tiling textures

Yeah.  After I gave up and regained my sanity.  I realized that creating four or five separate base tiling materials to use with mesh pieces I design, would be a lot less of a headache than to continue going this route.

I did a tiling atlas once and it took a lot of tweaking and planning.

Ultimately the polygon savings didn't add up to as much as I had hoped and the environment looked, well less then it could have if I just used a few extra polygons to smooth shapes out and tile the textures that way.

I was targeting a much older IOS at the time, but now days its likely the average phone can push more polygons then a last gen gaming conceal so you don't need to make things overly complicated on your self to save a few polys.

^^

I see what you mean.  I thank you for the screenshot too.  The plan is to design a mansion in modular fashion, for a horror demo a group I'm a part of are trying to get together.  I've been putting together mesh pieces that would snap together but needing the seamless textures to hide the tiling.  Knowing what I have figured out from this post, and past experience, I've wasted enough time trying to figure out how to go about doing this with an Atlas Maker.  The idea is great, but in my position, it won't work for what I want it to do.  Which is fine, lot less of a headache now that I know it.  Ha ha!

If you have any advice you can share with me, "what you would have done differently", kind of thing, I'd like to hear it and maybe those that see this post in the future it'll help them out as well. 

When it comes to polygons, I'm still worried about having too many, yet the game engine I'm using is UE4, it's probably a good thing to worry but I can be a little more liberal about using them at the same time.

I know your working with the Unreal Engen but I would highly recommend checking out Stephen Hauer's advice here:
http://www.digitaltutors.com/tutorial/1772-Creating-Professional-Studio-Game-Assets-for-Production-in-3ds-Max-and-Unity

Understanding Texel Density is so important to making good looking environments.

From naming conventions to scale there are a lot of little things he covers that will help you improve your workflow.

Other then that just have fun and don't be afraid to make mistakes. Mistakes mean your learning and that's something to be proud of.

^^

Thats a neat trick Vincent! :D


I know your working with the Unreal Engen but I would highly recommend checking out Stephen Hauer's advice here:
http://www.digitaltutors.com/tutorial/1772-Creating-Professional-Studio-Game-Assets-for-Production-in-3ds-Max-and-Unity

Understanding Texel Density is so important to making good looking environments.

From naming conventions to scale there are a lot of little things he covers that will help you improve your workflow.

Other then that just have fun and don't be afraid to make mistakes. Mistakes mean your learning and that's something to be proud of.

^^

Thank you for this.  I'll check this out when I get home tonight.  Having moved on from the original idea of this post to something more attainable, I feel like I can move forward now, have a gameplan, finished up a brick mask generator last night in SD.  Still tweaking it but looks good thus far.  I just signed up with DT for the free demo account.

On a side note, am I the only one that thinks that the little mascot they use for their site looks like JJ Abrams, or JJ Abrams stole his look from that character?

EDIT:  Also, I signed up for a free demo account, it didn't really clarify or I missed the info, does that allow me access to one course?  If so, I know which one I'm going with. ;-) ha ha
Last Edit: January 13, 2016, 03:31:48 pm