Author Topic: Workflow for painting levels  (Read 4691 times)

Hello. I am trying to figure out a workflow for using SP on a full level. The idea is that it would be nice to just go through a level and be able to paint sections that I wanted that possibly had unique materials instead of having to paint them in isolation. Is this type of workflow possible? I loaded a level and tried to do this, but it doesn't seem possible to rotate the camera with itself as an origin. The origin seems to always be pointed at the center of the world where the model is loaded. But perhaps this is just not the right way to approach this. Thanks for any tips.

Hey Fullmetalstobber,

I think I haven't understand your question quite well...

If you want to paint modular level assets like a sci-fi corridor, for instance, you could create smart materials and texture one.
The others could be easily textures by using the smart materials from the first module.


Best regards
Environment Artist - Twitter

I don't think any software of texturing will be suited for this type of workflow. Mainly because of performances reasons.
Especially in Substance painter, you can try to split your level in different texture set, but you will end up with a very big project file that will be hard to manage.

For the camera : to pivot point for the rotation in based on where you click on the mesh. By default the pivot is a the center of the bounding box of the mesh and doesn't change is you click in the 3D View outside of the mesh surface.
Don't forget your log file. It can be exported from the Help menu of the software.
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Fabrice Piquet aka Froyok. Product Manager, Technical Artist and Documentation at Adobe.

So  if I am understanding correctly, I would need to create a level and split the level out into multiple .fbx files, such as "Hallway_01.fbx", so that I could paint it in a more individual way? Sorry for the newbie question. SP makes perfect sense in my head when it comes to singular fbx models like characters, etc, but when it comes to entire levels, I am trying to figure out how I would use it for that.

Even if I split my level into different material sets, I would not be able to paint an individual part without splitting the level into multiple .fbx files I would think, so this seems to be the solution? Thanks.


So  if I am understanding correctly, I would need to create a level and split the level out into multiple .fbx files, such as "Hallway_01.fbx", so that I could paint it in a more individual way? Sorry for the newbie question. SP makes perfect sense in my head when it comes to singular fbx models like characters, etc, but when it comes to entire levels, I am trying to figure out how I would use it for that.

Even if I split my level into different material sets, I would not be able to paint an individual part without splitting the level into multiple .fbx files I would think, so this seems to be the solution? Thanks.

I am a noob when it comes to modular workflow as well (trying not to be), but from all the research I've done (plenty of good stuff on polycount forums btw), what you want to do is create sections of the walls, and other assets that you will combine in engine to make your level.

So, yes, you would have mutiple .fbx files (with proper UVs) and then you'll be texturing them separately as well. Pipesfranco did a pretty nice tutorial from start to finish on his modular scene:

https://youtu.be/z5LCNJFCDeU

That's part 5, which goes into Substance. I suggest checking out the whole thing though.

Hmm, why can't I place a URL on these forums?

**https://youtu.be/z5LCNJFCDeU**

Hey VictorB and fullmetalstobber,

the YouTube integration is still kinda broken, sorry.

Even if your level does not contain so many modular assets like buildings, streets or something like pipes, you have to model every asset individually.
Let me give you an example:

You want to create a small modern urban street. You model the buildings and the street modular so you end up having small pieces you can mix and expand the whole scene easily.
All other assets are made individually like the trees, hydrants or post boxes and waste bins.

You now need to texture all your assets individually, too.
You don't want to load the whole scene into Substance or the Engine.

I hope that helps a bit.


Best regards
Environment Artist - Twitter

Even if your level does not contain so many modular assets like buildings, streets or something like pipes, you have to model every asset individually.
Let me give you an example:

You want to create a small modern urban street. You model the buildings and the street modular so you end up having small pieces you can mix and expand the whole scene easily.
All other assets are made individually like the trees, hydrants or post boxes and waste bins.

You now need to texture all your assets individually, too.
You don't want to load the whole scene into Substance or the Engine.

I hope that helps a bit.


Best regards

I started to work on some level assets and I ended up texturing things like props individually... the fun part in this too is the fact that you can export the textures directly to substance designer by hotlinking your painter exports to it, and see the changes immediately. Unlike characters, you won't need to do much tweaking to the environment textures since it will look realistic.

Usually, I will just texture the big stuff that can be easily seen... I will most likely do this in Substance Painter.

Ah, this all makes a ton of sense. I know it was a little off topic for this forum probably, but I really appreciate the help. I am a software engineer by trade and recent painter/modeler, so I am obsessed with figuring out the best workflow:)

Thanks for the video. I'll check out polycount as well.

Ah, this all makes a ton of sense. I know it was a little off topic for this forum probably, but I really appreciate the help. I am a software engineer by trade and recent painter/modeler, so I am obsessed with figuring out the best workflow:)

Thanks for the video. I'll check out polycount as well.

The thing I've been figuring out real quick is that one person's workflow might not work for another person. You have to figure out what works best for you. It all just depends on what time, effort, and money you want to put into it.