Author Topic: There is a need for a "newbie questions" section!  (Read 8888 times)

ihelp-mac@shaw.ca


I've spent the last 25 years doing adult software training on Macintosh. I'm only now "getting into" 3dee modelling, and am fascinated by "texture" and "shaders".

I'm using Blender, as it is "FOSS" (free open-source software), so "the price is right". I cannot afford to switch hardware platforms (yet) or shell out $$$$ for high-end programs like Maya or 3dMax... I'm hoping there will be some sort of plug-in developed to allow Blender users to directly hook SD3 into the node-based shader capabilities in Blender 2.65.

I think there should be an "Idiot's Guide to Getting Started with Substance Designer" because I am unable to figure out the "workflow" with SD at all! I say this, because I'm GOOD at figuring out software when the manual is missing or just plain techno-babble.... So if I'm having trouble, I'm pretty sure there are a lot more people out there "suffering in silence" with the initial getting-started steps into SD3...

It is important to start out right when using complex tools, to CLEARLY understand what is  going on, and what the steps forward are.....

So, is it possible for somebody to put together a SIMPLE tutorial, on how to apply a SIMPLE texture to a SIMPLE mesh-object ("Gumby" or "Mr. Potato Head" sort of simple shape!!) and then follow-each-step-one-at-a-time, in very simple steps?

Start with a simple "clay" mesh object ("Gumby" or whatever! :) and ALL of the steps, no matter how small or "obvious" (ie: NOT obvious to a beginner!) they might be... How to bring it into the SD program, and pick/load in/or make from scratch a VERY simple texture, and apply it to the various "parts" of the model...

For example, what about UV maps? a.k.a. "skinning the cat"? Where, in SD, does this happen, and how does the user generate a map for each of the parts of the imported mesh (and then get it OUT of SD, to be used elsewhere)? AFAIK, .OBJ files do not support "bringing in Textures" with them.... So how does this work? And so on, and on....LOTS of "Newbie" (what some people would call "Stupid") questions...

Probably about one hours worth of tutorial video,  taking things very slowly, and pitching the content at the level you would, if you were teaching it to a bright kid in Grade 6.... ;)  would do wonders for you sales to people OTHER THAN professional game-designers.

Thanks for listening, I REALLY hope this happens soon, as I'm TOTALLY lost in the program, even after watching all of the tutorial video on this website...

you dont unwrap in substance designer.
its not possible and also no desirable function for the program.

if your willing to spend a few bucks, you might want to check out that link here:
http://www.vtc.com/products/Substance-Designer-2.1-Tutorials.htm
This guy was new to sd prior to this tutorial, too, i think i read somewhere.
Otherwise i'm sry, but if the podracer and cymourai tutorials went past you without teaching you the basics, i dont know where to point you other than to post your specific questions in the right subforums here...
Did you search Youtube for tutorials?

I think the tutorials are great and i learned a lot of them. The rest is practice.
Also, you might want to consider if your problems are SD related or just some geek problems, as you are new to 3d?!

Hi,

There are indeed lots of tutorials on our Youtube Channel.
Also, there is a very simple tutorial aka "My First Substance" in the online documentation: http://jira.allegorithmic.com/confluence

As it was pointed before, SD is a tool to create textures, not for modelling. That means that all the UV problems, skinning, etc. are not related with the tool. This is the 3D modeler part.

You should see SD as a kind of Photoshop dedicated for texturing. You first have to make your model ready in Blender: UV, IDMaterials, etc. Then you can start texturing in Substance Designer.

Cheers,
Head of Product Management

I think there should be an "Idiot's Guide to Getting Started with Substance Designer" because I am unable to figure out the "workflow" with SD at all! I say this, because I'm GOOD at figuring out software when the manual is missing or just plain techno-babble.... So if I'm having trouble, I'm pretty sure there are a lot more people out there "suffering in silence" with the initial getting-started steps into SD3..

I agree.

I purchased this software 1 year ago (Commercial License) and the lack of training is its only let down.

I have paid for the vtc.com training which BTW relates to a very early version 3.1 so is out of date by a long way.]

I have also paid for digitaltutors.com at a high price of $50 per month JUST to watch the 1.5 hour course on Substance Designer.
This is better as it at least focuses on creating textures from scratch and not texturing meshes.
I have learnt a bit more but other than the paid tutorials its very frustrating to be sat facing a node based system when I am Photoshop trained.

Those that have grasped the fundamentals seem to be keeping their cards close to their chest, perhaps because there is a niche market for .sbs files and so knowledge is income.

It's a VERY steep learning curve if you are totally new to this type of software.

I think the creators would benefit tremendously on the conversion from "demo to purchase" if they put more time and effort into providing step by step tutorials starting from a beginners stand point leading onto more advanced levels.

I own Filter Forge 3 Professional and whilst they are both node based engines they're very different as FF focuses on texture "creation" and not texturing 3D models.

For me, I only want to learn to create 2D and 3D textures from SD and as I say there is little to no training support for this type of use sadly.
Last Edit: June 17, 2013, 04:36:33 pm

Hi Rose, I'm sorry to hear you are having such a rough time of it... I am also a long-time Photoshop user (15 years), and was also an Adobe Certified Photoshop Expert at one point.

Coming to a node based workflow was somewhat new to me when I started with Substance Designer (v1.0), and I got very comfortable with it by the time I taught the VTC series (v2.1). So it is certainly possible to come from a Photoshop background and get along with SD very well -- in my case to the point where I was able to drop Photoshop for 3D texturing entirely.

I would have 2 questions for you:

1) Is it the non-linear aspect of the nodes workflow or the nodes settings themselves you find more difficult?

2) Have you watched these tutorials: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLIbMNGfLdtRDpkuP_lcx_yCqVaZxUxRdY

The reason I ask is that free tutorial series goes over the nodes in depth and features quite a bit of information about the new(ish) bitmap painting features -- which as a Photoshop user you should find very easy to use.

The reason I reference my youtube playlist is becasue while the same tutorials are available on this page: http://www.allegorithmic.com/tutorials/first-steps, becasue of the way that page is designed it is very easy to miss all the good stuff hidden in the links at the top (Atomic Nodes, Bitmap Node, SVG Node, etc.) .
Last Edit: June 19, 2013, 03:01:58 pm

I have recently bought SD and love its power for creating great textures.
There are many great tuts available, you just have too look.
My suggestion is maybe you need a new section on the forum to notify users when new videos (Tuts) are available.

I constantly look in my download section to see if a new revision of SD is available. I think you also need a section to advise users.


I constantly look in my download section to see if a new revision of SD is available. I think you also need a section to advise users.

Hi,

You get a pop-up in Substance Designer when a new version is available, so no need to check the download section all the time.

Regarding tutorials we will have a new revamp of the whole section in the coming weeks, which should make things much more clear.

Cheers,
Nicolas
Head of Product Management

I have recently bought SD and love its power for creating great textures.
There are many great tuts available, you just have too look.
My suggestion is maybe you need a new section on the forum to notify users when new videos (Tuts) are available.

I constantly look in my download section to see if a new revision of SD is available. I think you also need a section to advise users.


Hello and many thanks for responding. (Sorry for my late reply)

I will admit I have little patience with learning new software. I am self taught with Photoshop because there are thousands of courses and tutorials that have helped me.

I have a basic understanding of SD and even created a basic chipped paint on wood substance that I uploaded to this forum for people to download.

I sell what I make and I make game textures and materials so taking weeks or months out to learn software with very little ground level support is not ideal as that's time I could be creating new content.
Hence my reluctance to devote more time to learning SD. I purchased it under the assumption it would be like Photoshop in the sense there would be lots of training and tutorials to follow. It appears most tutorials are aimed at working with models. That's not my area sadly.

I own B2M and totally understand that software. I need no tutorials to "get" that. Very nice tool and works better than its competitors.

I will look into your links (Thanks again) and I think I will reverse engineer one of the samples as advised by another forum member. I have always found I learn faster by popping the hood and seeing how the engine works, so to speak.

Thanks again!

... software with very little ground level support...

I really don´t understand this quote. The support and the tutorials from Allegorithmic are simply outstanding (I am working with Ddo at the same time, and this is just the opposite. Quixel even deleted the forum lately).

I would recommend subscribing to the allegorithmic youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-toy9WMImypmLAiU9h_SzQ

And if you are confused by the up-to-dateness, just start with the 4.x tutorials.

Substance Designer is a game changer, and this needs a bit of an learning effort - but it´s worth every minute, you spend!


... software with very little ground level support...

I really don´t understand this quote. The support and the tutorials from Allegorithmic are simply outstanding (I am working with Ddo at the same time, and this is just the opposite. Quixel even deleted the forum lately).

I would recommend subscribing to the allegorithmic youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-toy9WMImypmLAiU9h_SzQ

And if you are confused by the up-to-dateness, just start with the 4.x tutorials.

Substance Designer is a game changer, and this needs a bit of an learning effort - but it´s worth every minute, you spend!

Ahh! New tutorials. I gave up on it some months back and i purchased it 2 years ago (3.1)  when there really was next to nothing in training beyond the User Manual.
The link which you kindly provided states they were added four months ago, which is newer than this thread, so hopefully I can start over and this time get a better feel for it :)

thanks again

I understand - I hadn´t noticed the date  of your post :)


hi how can I put 2 normal in substance painter mi character is divided in 2 parts head and body???

hi how can I put 2 normal in substance painter mi character is divided in 2 parts head and body???

Hello,

For each part, you can assign a material in your 3D app. In Substance Painter, these parts will now be separated into Texture Sets. For each texture set, you can set the normal map in the Document Settings.

Cheers,

Wes
Head of Substance Demo Art Team
the3dninja@adobe.com
Twitter: The3DNinja