Author Topic: "Standard" Workflow?  (Read 3145 times)

Let's say you got Live (which I do), what's the standard workflow between Painter and Designer (we assume any 3D modeling comes before these two and you're going to import your mesh)?  I sometimes feel that I should be doing my base textures/baking information in Designer, and then doing touch ups in Painter if needed. But, the thing is, I really...really hate how Painter exports the maps. I mean, it's really really really ugly... I know, the end result is the same, but for presentations, it's kind of sad showing off my Color Base/Normals. Rough/Metal maps aren't too bad, but still, not consistent if you've started from Designer. Anyone have any tips?


Hey victoranthonyburgos,

this YouTube Playlist on the Allegorithmic Channel can help you: http://goo.gl/B2Lv6M

The Basic approach is, as you said, doing touch ups and details in Substance Painter to get masks at the end and bring those back to Designer.


Best Regards
Environment Artist - Twitter

Thanks a lot for that link, it showed as "watched" when I went on there before (Youtube lying) but it was very insightful. For those who want the TLDR (or TLDW, Too Long Didn't Watch):

  • Model in 3D application and then export a Low and High poly mesh
  • Import into Designer
  • In Designer, bake Normal, Curvature, Ambient Occlusion maps
  • From Designer, export maps into Painter and start the texturing process there creating a base material to start with, adding height details, surface attributes such as roughness, etc.
  • From Painter, export the new combined normal BACK into Designer
  • Designer will be used as a Texturing Hub
  • Once you're done, publish the substance material (.sbsar file), and then use that in your engine. 

That's what I got out of what Wes was saying anyway. Anyone have more to add? Any tips?
Last Edit: April 10, 2015, 04:46:29 am

This seems like an odd workflow Victor. I would have thought the most obvious way to do things is to do all of your base texturing in Designer and then move to Painter to add smaller custom features? Although yes the videos I've seen also describe a SP to SD workflow. Interested to know if there's something I'm missing with my current approach.
T

Yeah I would like to know this too. I thought the best approach was:
Create base materials in SD
Create bakes in SD and do mesh adaptive masks to get overall general masks
Go into SP to create any specific masks.

Though the mesh adaptive filters in SD are probably the same as SP so its likely you could do your mesh adaptive stuff in either application.

I am gonna have to get stuck in to SP as I am so far only working in SD.

Yeah I would like to know this too. I thought the best approach was:
Create base materials in SD
Create bakes in SD and do mesh adaptive masks to get overall general masks
Go into SP to create any specific masks.

Though the mesh adaptive filters in SD are probably the same as SP so its likely you could do your mesh adaptive stuff in either application.

I am gonna have to get stuck in to SP as I am so far only working in SD.
This seems like an odd workflow Victor. I would have thought the most obvious way to do things is to do all of your base texturing in Designer and then move to Painter to add smaller custom features? Although yes the videos I've seen also describe a SP to SD workflow. Interested to know if there's something I'm missing with my current approach.
T


:) This was 2 months ago, and a lot has changed with my own workflows when using SD/SP. But you are all correct in your own ways. Also, a lot has changed within the products themselves, especially the ability to bake out whatever you want all inside SP.

Some folks don't even use SD or B2M (I've barely started using B2M myself), it all just really depends on what you need to accomplish and how efficient you want to do it.

Hey Guys,

There are many ways to work with Designer and Painter. I would say it depends on the type of project. If you are needing to create a substance material for use in engine, then you will most likely use Designer. You could start with base materials in Painter and then consolidate textures to Designer. At this point, Designer becomes the hub where you assemble textures and add effects that will be controlled as parameters.

Another workflow I see is that most of the work is done in SD and then Painter is used for the finishing and polishing work. I attached an image that shows the texture pipeline for Substance. We have also seen many large project who use Painter solely as well.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Cheers,

wes

Integrations Product Manager / Training
wes.mcdermott@allegorithmic.com
Twitter: The3DNinja

My issue arose mainly because I was working on a texture atlas for about 6 assets that had to tile horizontally but didn't have directly overlaid UV's so all of the mesh bake stuff wasn't an option for me.

I wish I had looked into SP sooner as it would have been a time saver when it came to adding dirt and scratches.

Cannot wait to get some time to do work soon and get stuck in to painter.