Author Topic: Allegorithmic is joining the Adobe family (part 1)  (Read 74156 times)

I guess you know more about our deal than we do then  ::)

All due respect it appears you do not know about the deal. One of your posts said something along the lines of "The details are being worked out and I can only comment on what I know now." So if the details are being worked out, no one knows what the deal is

I said this before Allegorithmic has been good to us customers for the past few years. With that you got to face facts

  You are not the first people to be bought out by Adobe. So this is not the first time that a bunch of new Adobe employees spent the day telling customers "Everything will be fine" only to see shortly after it isn't. You can already see the rift with different talking points being presented here and on the Adobe forums

Right there, you sold out to Adobe with NO plan at all, without even trying to gain an assurance of fair treatment on behalf of your user base. What a 'fuck you' to your fans.
Of course there are plans, but a lot of it is still being discussed, hence why we are not disclosing more for now.
Most decisions we've ever taken as a company were discussed for months beforehand and the details ironed out until days before the announcement, that's how we take good, informed, sensible decisions and how we've been able to be successful until now.
Last Edit: January 24, 2019, 03:43:54 am

I guess you know more about our deal than we do then  ::)
I hope I'm wrong but I've worked in IT since 1999 (4 years before Allegorithmic was formed I have to point out).

I don't know the details of the deal but I frankly don't think I need to - I've seen the results before.

When adobe announced its CC model... I said no way, not ever.

And I have not. Ive remained on CS6.

I wanted to buy Maya out the gate. When Autodesk went to subscription only (with that laughable pricetag to boot) I bought Modo instead. Straight up bought the perpetual, not the indie.

I was going to upgrade my vue copy from 11 to the current. When they came back and went only subscription, I said nope, not it.

The same thing will happen here. I currently actually hold a sub to substance.... even though I do own perpetual. To get maintenance and substance source, you cant go wrong. But I feel like my willingness to sub to it, is going to be fleeting once Adobe gets their hands on it.

I.Will.Not.Rent.Software. Not now, not ever.

I ran to substance to get away from adobe. This is just awful news indeed.

I predict sculpting and height-map blending will become the new favorite ways to create materials.
3D art is magic.

I am in visual (3D) arts since 1994, and using Adobe "software". Adobe has maybe the worst (nearly zero) support of all software packages I know. Adobe "software" does not evolve, they just put as much new stuff in it to tell us that investing in the new updated version makes sense. It is a company for suits and marketing agents, not developers, nerds, art-freaks and all the cool guys doing the fun stuff. The only thing Adobe can is code very stable (not fast) tools. It is the 20th Fox of graphics software, and as a daily user of Photoshop and others for more than 20 years I think I know what I am talking about.

Substance is completely on the other side.. it does so absolutely NOT fit into the Adobe world!

My only hope is: After Autodesk bought Alias we all cried out loud.. but after the quirky Maya 2009 it got better and better. It is nearly impossible that Adobe will have a positive effect on the development of Substance (at its best Adobe just does nothing and let Allegorithmic do what the did the last 15 years).

Btw: I own Adobe full subscription for 27,- a month (Black Friday Sale), and Maya LT for 13,- / month (Black Friday once again), so the argument "toooo expensive" does not count. In the early days a single Maya licence was about 20.000,- and Photoshop 2000,-
Vertex slashing since 1994 | 3D Modelling | Environmental & Level Design | Scripting | UI Design | Game Development | www.behance.net/MarioCada

I boycotted the twin evil monoliths, Adobe and Autodesk, years ago so I suppose this means goodbye.

R.I.P.

FYI:

"The road to hell is paved with good intentions."
Last Edit: January 24, 2019, 04:22:38 am

I guess you know more about our deal than we do then  ::)
I hope I'm wrong but I've worked in IT since 1999 (4 years before Allegorithmic was formed I have to point out).

I don't know the details of the deal but I frankly don't think I need to - I've seen the results before.

Same here. I've been through this before.
All begin with nice words and talk, good intentions, and then... come what must happen !

In a quiet, dark corner a broken Mudbox - shadow of his former self - is consoling a weeping Substance Suite........ 'Me too, buddy....me too....'

As the saying goes:
All good things must come to an end. Actually all things will come to an end, but whatever.

Lets face it, it's all done; the Adobe employees who worked at Allegorithmic are just doing damage control.

goodbye substance, Hello 3d Coat! Just purchased.

I agree...Totally fucking pissed!

There is no "script" but things are still being decided and adjusted, I will only comment on what I'm certain of today.

So you're saying you sold out your company and user base without even having a plan decided on? Jesus Christ. Guess Sebastien just could not wait to be Peter Jackson, huh?

Love the side notes we're getting from your own employees on the reddit threads. This one is pretty good



"We fear this too"

Right there, you sold out to Adobe with NO plan at all, without even trying to gain an assurance of fair treatment on behalf of your user base. What a 'fuck you' to your fans.

Here's my concern, I work in VFX and feature animation, a fairly niche market in the grand scheme of things. Adobe is a company geared towards selling software to the masses. They view 3D content creation as something that is going to become more mainstream in the future, which is probably true. How concerned are they going to be with issues like seamless UDIM painting and features that pertain to a tiny segment of the potential market? I just can't see them caring all that much about vfx pipeline tools, unless this is just one move of a much larger strategy to break into 3d.

We shall see I guess.

Here's my concern, I work in VFX and feature animation, a fairly niche market in the grand scheme of things. Adobe is a company geared towards selling software to the masses. They view 3D content creation as something that is going to become more mainstream in the future, which is probably true. How concerned are they going to be with issues like seamless UDIM painting and features that pertain to a tiny segment of the potential market? I just can't see them caring all that much about vfx pipeline tools, unless this is just one move of a much larger strategy to break into 3d.

We shall see I guess.

I agree 100%. I'm in the games industry and they won't give a shit about this either. When Adobe say they are 'expanding to the 3D market, they mean 3D for 2D artists who fail miserably at 3D. i.e: clicking a few buttons in a childish UI that will result in 'photorealistic' product design and logos that will WOW! all your friends when you post it to social media.

I doubt there's a single employee at Adobe who even nows what a UDIM tag is.

Substance materials will probably be integrated into their shitty 'Keyshot for idiots' dead-ware called Dimensions, but the days of Sub Painter/Designer being industry leaders at the forefront of a texturing revolution are over. The very thoughts of Adobe working on a Substance graph new feature doesn't even compute.
Last Edit: January 24, 2019, 04:42:39 am

this is unfortunate, i really enjoyed substance designer.. but i hate Adobe.  oh well.