Author Topic: Where Designer ends and Painter begins.  (Read 1369 times)

I'm starting to find my feet with both programs, but I'm a little confused about the overlapping functionalities of both and which combination of "this is done in painter, this is done in designer" I should be thinking about. I'm a game environment artist, so that should help to explain my priorities.

What confuses me is the ability to use mask generators and trilinear projection nodes in Designer, when those are also core parts of Painter. It may be easiest to explain what I -think- is going on here, so someone can tell me if I'm getting this right.

So my understanding is that Painter can do all the same projection and mask generation, and they dont need to be included in the materials I create in designer. However, they CAN be included, in which case the material is more of a Smart Material and can be quickly slapped onto any asset without me setting up all the masks again. They will already be set to project and blend materials in the correct places relative to my baked maps. So basically I can create materials in Designer that do some of the work for me, that I would normally have to do for each asset in Painter manually otherwise.

I feel like this makes sense and is probably right, but I want to make sure Painter doesnt actually require these functions be included in the material from Designer, in order to use them in Painter. That these functions are overlapping, not dependent. Thanks.
Last Edit: September 26, 2018, 04:19:44 pm

I'm starting to find my feet with both programs, but I'm a little confused about the overlapping functionalities of both and which combination of "this is done in painter, this is done in designer" I should be thinking about. I'm a game environment artist, so that should help to explain my priorities.

What confuses me is the ability to use mask generators and trilinear projection nodes in Designer, when those are also core parts of Painter. It may be easiest to explain what I -think- is going on here, so someone can tell me if I'm getting this right.

So my understanding is that Painter can do all the same projection and mask generation, and they dont need to be included in the materials I create in designer. However, they CAN be included, in which case the material is more of a Smart Material and can be quickly slapped onto any asset without me setting up all the masks again. They will already be set to project and blend materials in the correct places relative to my baked maps. So basically I can create materials in Designer that do some of the work for me, that I would normally have to do for each asset in Painter manually otherwise.

I feel like this makes sense and is probably right, but I want to make sure Painter doesnt actually require these functions be included in the material from Designer, in order to use them in Painter. That these functions are overlapping, not dependent. Thanks.

Hi,

We do have some overlap with the generators between Painter and Designer. This is because the generators were created in Designer before we had Painter.

I think it's best to think of Designer as a texturing tool for creating procedural base materials and working with scan data. You can then publish the base materials you create for use in various applications and engines using the substance plugin. You can also export textures only. The main focus is that you are creating tiling base materials that are not specific to a mesh or UV layout. These base materials, exported as a Substance material, can also be imported into Painter. For example, I never load a mesh into Designer. I use a sphere or plane and create the material. The material is agnostic to the mesh it will eventually be applied.

With Painter, you are painting on the 3D mesh. It's purpose is more for working on props, weapons, characters, etc. With painter, you are not focusing on creating tiling base materials, but instead working on meshes that have specific UV layouts.

Before we had Painter, we were creating workflows for users to import a mesh and create textures. It wasn't nearly as fluid as Painter. Now that we have Painter, it provides a better solution for painting and working specific meshes. 

I hope this is helpful : )

Cheers,
Wes
Head of Substance Demo Art Team
the3dninja@adobe.com
Twitter: The3DNinja