Author Topic: Wet Fabric  (Read 1105 times)

I just bought Substance Designer, and I want to make a wet t-shirt or fabric material, can anyone walk a beginner through how that is done?

There are three separate parts to a task like this:

1.  The mesh - wet material is heavier, and tends to cling to the surface underneath it.  Your asset will need to reflect this.

2.  The textures.  The actual fabric pattern itself is relatively straightforward (and something close is likely available on substance source).  Fabric tends to slightly darken when it gets wet, so you'll likely need to lower the luminosity of the albedo (base colour) map to reflect this. 

3.  The shader.  Wet fabric, particularly thin T-shirt fabric, becomes more translucent than when it was dry.  You can fake this in a texture by reducing the opacity, but really you need a translucent shader.  The shader is telling a renderer (realtime or not) how the textures should be used.

Substance can do part 2 in a substance material, and part 3 in a material description (mdl) if you want to go that far.  Part 1 will be down to your modelling / sculpting skills.

Hope that helps

AJ

Hey,

I used this tutorial for a Fabric, and I learned alot!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHK-TqhXtmc

Hope it helps

I was thinking about this too.

My first thought was about how a (thin) wet t-shirt clings to the skin and you see the skin below it.  So I was thinking you'd be able to use a World Normal map because the "upward-facing" parts are where the shirt would hang tight on the skin, and the "downward-facing" parts are where the shirt would be away from the sking.  But then I realized you'd need the shirt mesh to reference the World Normal map of the body.  That would be an interesting challenge.
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I was thinking about this too.

My first thought was about how a (thin) wet t-shirt clings to the skin and you see the skin below it.  So I was thinking you'd be able to use a World Normal map because the "upward-facing" parts are where the shirt would hang tight on the skin, and the "downward-facing" parts are where the shirt would be away from the sking.  But then I realized you'd need the shirt mesh to reference the World Normal map of the body.  That would be an interesting challenge.

If you're going with this pre-baked method, It might be best to bake out a height map for the shirt mesh, using a high-poly shirt as the "high poly" and the skin as low poly... Then project this onto the low poly shirt's uv's. That way you'll be able to figure out what parts of the shirt are close to touching by its low heightmap height.