Author Topic: "Brush opacity control" FR is marked as completed - is it?  (Read 3336 times)

There is now a control for brush opacity, but it is not related to stylus pressure. Brush opacity only controls the maximum blend amount of a stroke.

From the feature request:
'Paint "dab" is added to previous "dab" regardless of stylus pressure, making it impossible to easily blend colors with pressure sensitivity.

Solution would be to add a new variable "opacity" which could be linked to stylus pressure and a way to turn off paint accumulation. This brush mode combines all of the paint dabs inside single continuous stroke so that hardest pressure pixels replace the lower pressure pixels instead of adding to them (like in accumulation) while lower pressure pixels have no effect. This makes strokes easily controllable with tablet pressure, allowing for large swathes to be colored and blended quickly.'

This pretty much describes how traditional digital brush works, reference attached. Could you do this simply by changing the brush dab math to minimum instead of subtract?

I believe you hold down the "A" key to get the behavior you are looking for.

(I might be wrong about the letter.  I'm not at my Painter computer right now, so I can't verify that.  Please, someone correct me if needed.)
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To me it seems you don't get the functionality - 'A' only sets next stroke maximum blend to same as the previous stroke.

And 'Flow' only defines how fast 'Opacity' threshold is reached, so pressure sensitivity in 'Flow' is quite useless for hand painting.

The only way to gradually blend is to set 'Flow' to max and 'Opacity' to a small number and do many passes over and over.

Indeed, our brush engine uses a "copy" blending mode in-between stamps of a same stroke. Photoshop, when using a uniform color with pressure sensitivity, uses a "maximum" blending mode (it switches back to copy if you are using color jittering). We are looking into giving you the option to switch between blending modes.