Author Topic: Substance Designer to UE4.  (Read 4165 times)

Typical problem - materials look different in SD and UE4.

Similar threads suggest that usually it is caused by different lighting/reflections etc, but it seems everyone using Substance Painter, so I'm not sure if this is correct (somehow I doubt SD and UE4 use same renderer) or there are some additional steps needed when baking textures from SD.
Something like putting levels right before output node and making roughness map 50% brighter, that kind of thing.

Maybe there is some way to setup SD so it would render material more closely to UE4?

Typical problem - materials look different in SD and UE4.

Similar threads suggest that usually it is caused by different lighting/reflections etc, but it seems everyone using Substance Painter, so I'm not sure if this is correct (somehow I doubt SD and UE4 use same renderer) or there are some additional steps needed when baking textures from SD.
Something like putting levels right before output node and making roughness map 50% brighter, that kind of thing.

Maybe there is some way to setup SD so it would render material more closely to UE4?

Hi,

I'm sorry for the issue. You shouldn't have issues with SD or SP looking drastically different then UE4. Substance is only textures that are then plugged into the UE4 material. The substance PBR shader is using the same GGX BRDF as UE4. With this you don't need to make any adjustments to maps.

The main differences as you mentioned will be in lighting. In UE4 you have to have a reflection probe setup. The other issue is that we use importance sampling for the environment and UE4 uses Split-sum-approximation. This will causes differences in the fidelity of the roughness. With UE4 you do need to make sure that the maps are interpreted correctly. If you import maps from Painter you need to uncheck the sRGB option for the roughess, metallic and ambient occlusion.

Please take a look at this video to see how the setup works.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VSLxOTDi0Kw&index=2&list=PLB0wXHrWAmCzn3kcuShqtf-FQrOM93Qtx

CHeers,
wes




Head of Substance Demo Art Team
the3dninja@adobe.com
Twitter: The3DNinja

Thanks, Wes.
Unchecking sRGB makes material more... err, adequate.

Thanks, Wes.
Unchecking sRGB makes material more... err, adequate.

No problem : ) UE4 needs to have the images flagged correctly. Maps that represent data such as AO, roughness, metal, they need to be interpreted as linear (uncheck sRGB). Maps that represent color such as base color need to be flagged as sRGB so they will be gamma corrected by the shader.

Cheers,
wes
Head of Substance Demo Art Team
the3dninja@adobe.com
Twitter: The3DNinja